Adding Buttons and Banners to Your Ryze Page

You already know how to add a picture using html, now we are going to turn that image into a link. Short lesson.

<a href=”url of website you want to link to”><img src=”url of image”/></a>

To change the Sage Hill Farm to a clickable button, this is the code we will use:

<a href=”http://www.sagehillfarmsandvintagestore.com/” mce_href=”http://www.sagehillfarmsandvintagestore.com/” > <img src=”http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/4813/1454/320/bannersagehill.jpg” mce_src=”http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/4813/1454/320/bannersagehill.jpg” /> </a >

And we have:

Sage Hill Farms

Adding Photos to Ryze

I belong to the Fun with Photography network. We post photos in our forum posts, give each other advice, encouragement, tips. I know that I have learned much from the other members, improved my skills, and encouraged me to continue. About once a month, one of the new members will ask “How do I add my photo into a post?”

It works the same way as adding extra pictures to a Ryze page. Ryze allows you to upload one photo as a basic member and 5 as a gold member. These images are stored on Ryze’s servers, using their memory, bandwidth. Ryze gives us another option. We are able to use html in our network posts and under the edit home page contents link. (On the left, right below your blog and website links.) These directions will work for both forum posts and home page contents. If you decide that you want to do more, there is a network on Ryze called Home Page Helpers.

1. Upload the Photo/Image The image must be stored somewhere online, often as a jpg, gif, png, etc. There are several places to do that. Many internet providers offer space, an online photo service, on your blog, etc. PhotoBucket is one of the more popular places to upload photos. It even provides the html code for your image, so you can just cut and paste this code into your post or homepage and it’s done. Flickr is a good site, but not if you want world-wide coverage. Several Mid-Eastern countries block Flicker, which means that they’ll get a big x instead of your image. (Also get an x if the hosting website is down). I have many of my photos hosted at CareToConnect online community. Blogger lets you upload pictures also.

2. Find the URL URL is the webaddress of your image. Ryze has to know where your image is. Right click on the image, click on properties, and you’ll see the URL . In our example, I went to Bea’s Beatitudes scrolled down her button or Sage Hill Farms, right clicked and copied the url.

http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/
4813/1454/320/
bannersagehill.jpg

3. Type in the image html code Type the code:
<img src="url" />
and add any desired text. Our example code is
<img src="http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/4813/1454/320/
bannersagehill.jpg"/>

And you’ll see the button image, with the words smashed up against the image.

4. Give yourself some space <p> will give you a new paragraph, adds a new line and space. So give yourself some space and add some p’s (Note </p> closes each paragraph)

Congratulate yourself, you can now add images. In this case, we wanted the image to be a clickable button, one that takes you to Sage Hill Farms. See our next lesson–Adding buttons and banners.

Connecting on Ryze

Ryze.com is one of my favorite spots to network for business online. There is always a learning curve when you learn something new. Patricia has been so kind and to put together some links that make a wonderful little primer on how to use Ryze effectively. Thank you so much.

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Enjoy, this is from Althea Garner’s Networkers First Stop Training Board! Hugs Patricia

____________________________________________

Now I want to just share some more wonderful and very helpful links that I have been posting on my own board found on the Networkers First Stop Training board (mentioned in the guide) moderated by Althea Garner and co moderated by Scott Allen (The Virtual Handshake ).

These tips are drawn from various discussions during their time here on ryze and formulated into a jumping off platform of general help only (always be sure to review and go back to Ryze’s TOS and Guidelines) to help all of us better navigate and utilize our memberships!
___________

From the Networkers First Stop Training Board

Current, as of 3:15pm – August 9,2006

1: Controlling Messages in Your Inbox

2: Opening Up Your Guestbooks

3: Network With Me!

4: Friends and your sphere of influence

5: What You Can… and Cannot Say On Public Boards!

6: Requesting ‘Friends’ status

7: What do I do if I am suspended by Ryze?

8: How important is accurate spelling and grammar on Ryze?

9: So you don’t like what someone else posted!

10: What is the purpose of a Signature Block?

11: The use of aliases and having more than one membership……

12: Veiled advertising on Networks

13: The Events Page

14: How to Introduce Yourself in a Network (Scott Allen Co Moderator Post)

15A: Increasing Your Visibility…..

15B: Ryze and Politics…….

16: Advertising on Ryze…..

17: Moderated Networks

The Power of Thank You

I send out thank you cards. Once they’ve been sent out, I forget that I’ve sent the card.  Yet the good will always seems to come back to me.

You’ve ever visited someone’s website and something they wrote made you stop and think, left an impact on your life. How about a teleseminar, forum post, etc. We expect a thank you note when a physical gift is given such as a birthday or wedding present, but imagine how the recipient feels when they get an unexpected thanks.

I’d been reading an article by Brian Biro, it was very well written, easy to understand and conveyed the message that I’d like to get across to others. Since it was a message I could forward, I did so. Then I looked up his website, found a mailing address, and sent a card expressing my thanks.

Imagine my surprise when received the coolest package in the mail from Brian Biro, a wonderful handwritten thank you note, one of his cd’s on overcoming the odds (my kids even listened to this more than once), his book The Joyful Spirit, and a calendar. It made my day, and I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend his material. His book was short, and well-written, the cd we listened to often.

My kids are on the swim team at their school. One particular mother was always at every meet, etc. helping with anything and everything, keeping the rest of us parents informed. I sent her a thank you along with a photo from a meet. She called me back, saying that the card brought tears to her eyes and she put the card up on her fridge.

One of the young ladies broke a school record and I sent her a card. Every time I see her mom, she thanks me again for that card and how much it meant.

Now I not sharing these things to brag, the cards were sent to people who truly deserved them, it was just a small token of appreciation. But as I go through my day-to-day life, I’ll get a smile, a word or thanks, a phone call, brightens my day in return. Paid in full and then some.

Have any thank you card sending stories you’d like to share?
I’d love to read them.

No stories to share? Send a thank you card to someone today, a real card sent to someone you care about, without leaving your computer.  (If you want to send the card from your phone there is an app for that-just ask)  I’ll pay for the card and postage, just so you can try my favorite card sending system, and brighten someone’s day.  Visit my website below to send your free card.  Questions? Just get in touch.

Heidi Caswell
www.GetYourCardsHere.com

Connecting with Family

Summer Blooms

Ya’ll know that August in East Texas is hot and humid, especially this year. So we do the insane thing and go camping, in tents none the less! My two oldest are married, two other boys head to college in September, the others start school in just a few days. Rarely can we get them all together, and the boys wanted to go camping, giving up work hours, time with girlfriends, etc. if we’d just take them camping for a few days. Even my married son was coming with his family, just missing my oldest daughter who lives over a thousand miles away.

First we found what we hoped to be one of the cooler nearby areas, gather up food and gear to feed/house a small army, and stuff everything, including a couple of bikes, into/on top of a mini-van along with 7 people, (four of which are over 6 ft tall). Then oldest son packs his Camero with his wife, teething baby, dog, food, baby stuff, camping gear, and bike. (He gets an award for that, reminding me of back in high school when we tried to see how many we could fit into a Volkswagen bettle). They follow a several hours later.

Less than an hour down the road, we lose a tire, tread peeled off completely, just like peeling an orange. Husband fussing at the tire makers, something about cheap, and thread seperation. Pull over, it is over 90 outside, AC is now off, windows open, pull off bike rack to get to spare, unload some stuff in back to get to tire jack. Tire jack is rusty, van heavily loaded, Arkansas highway patrol comes by and saves the day, we need a jack like theirs, officer watches traffic, makes sure guys don’t get run over. I pass out water bottles, and call friends, looking for tire stores in upcoming towns (while guys do the hard part). Thanks to Jeanine, Arkansas highway patrol, and those strong guys, we make it back on the road, looking for a tire store.

Found a Walmart, don’t have our size, they send us to a tire place, they just told the last person they couldn’t change theirs until the afternoon. They have mercy on us, round up help and a couple of tires, while I head to the nearby air conditioned McD’s for hamburgers with the hungry, bored, hot kids. We sit there long enough for the kids to read the nutrition fact sheets as they realize how unhealthy our lunch really is. Van fixed, back on the road, just a few hours behind schedule.

Later, last town before Mt Nebo is Russellville, sign at the bank says 107, I hope it isn’t correct. Head towards the campsite, steep winding road, no trailers over 24′ allowed. Watch that gas needle move on down. Where is the smoke coming from? Our van? Surely not, just one more mile to go. Yep the smoke is us, no place to pull over, pit stop middle of road, stuff dripping/pouring out of bottom of van. Turns out it is transmission fluid, guy comes by in same make/model of van, tells us there is a pull over spot just a couple of turns ahead, he follows us. Turns out transmission got hot, started leaking, if we let it cool, add transmission fluid, it might make it to the top. I unload kids, hike up last mile, yes it is a very steep, girls start walking backwards as their legs, ankles were getting sore. Nice campsites, visitor’s center another .6 mile away, at least the ground is now level. Van catches up.

View

Visitor’s center just closed for the night, pick your own spot, pay in the morning. Lots of good choices, pick the one with a great view, (next morning we find it reserved for the next night and have to move camp to a neighboring spot. Call son we hasn’t made it yet, have him pick up some transmission fluid.

Baby Jack's family

Starts to rain, cools off some, clears up, cook hamburgers, hotdogs, somemores. Turn on fans and crash for the night. Son shows up, baby Jack’s first camping trip. He loves the outdoors, he can be fussing and fussing, and you walk outside with him and he instantly gets quiet. He slept longer at night, skipping more feedings than he has ever done before.

Pool

Next day gets hot quick, that pool looks pretty good by the time it opens, all of us jump in. Nice pool with a view, water slide, water toys. Lots of sunscreen, stop for late lunch, meaning to return. Bike riding, hiking, souvenir shopping, storm comes in.

Storm

Watching

I love watching storms come in. The air is so alive. Not raining on us, wind whipping up, cools off nicely. Lightening across the valley, a couple of fires started. Quite the show from up on top. Calms down, more hiking and bike riding, picture taking. Back to camp, start fire, now it rains. Kids play cards in tent, while we cook supper, put up tarp. Eat, clean up, rain stops of course.

Mt Nebo Sunrise

Nice morning, I head over to sunrise point to get some pictures, lots of haze/fog from previous rain, didn’t bring UV filter, trip back down the mountain, no problems.

Mt Nebo view

Relaxing, building memories. The kids are still saying how much fun they had and would love to head back in the fall. If we do make that trip again, we may just rent one of the cabins, bring less stuff, ditch the van.